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Market Broiler Restaurant: Please Take Shark off Your Menu

oceanaware:

Please sign and share this petition! Market Broiler is serving shark, Thresher or Mako.

All three species of Thresher and both species of Mako are listed on the IUCN Red List as vulnerable. Their population trend is decreasing due to over-exploitation. 

Not only are these sharks at risk, but human health is at risk as well. Sharks contain some of the highest levels of mercury, making it dangerous for consumption. 

From the NRDC:

Once in the human body, mercury acts as a neurotoxin, interfering with the brain and nervous system.

Exposure to mercury can be particularly hazardous for pregnant women and small children. During the first several years of life, a child’s brain is still developing and rapidly absorbing nutrients. Even in low doses, mercury may affect a child’s development, delaying walking and talking, shortening attention span and causing learning disabilities. Less frequent, high dose prenatal and infant exposures to mercury can cause mental retardation, cerebral palsy, deafness and blindness.

In adults, mercury poisoning can adversely affect fertility and blood pressure regulation and can cause memory loss, tremors, vision loss and numbness of the fingers and toes. A growing body of evidence suggests that exposure to mercury may also lead to heart disease.

Please sign and share!

Don’t forget to sign and share, please! 

Market Broiler Restaurant: Please Take Shark off Your Menu

Please sign and share this petition! Market Broiler is serving shark, Thresher or Mako.

All three species of Thresher and both species of Mako are listed on the IUCN Red List as vulnerable. Their population trend is decreasing due to over-exploitation. 

Not only are these sharks at risk, but human health is at risk as well. Sharks contain some of the highest levels of mercury, making it dangerous for consumption. 

From the NRDC:

Once in the human body, mercury acts as a neurotoxin, interfering with the brain and nervous system.

Exposure to mercury can be particularly hazardous for pregnant women and small children. During the first several years of life, a child’s brain is still developing and rapidly absorbing nutrients. Even in low doses, mercury may affect a child’s development, delaying walking and talking, shortening attention span and causing learning disabilities. Less frequent, high dose prenatal and infant exposures to mercury can cause mental retardation, cerebral palsy, deafness and blindness.

In adults, mercury poisoning can adversely affect fertility and blood pressure regulation and can cause memory loss, tremors, vision loss and numbness of the fingers and toes. A growing body of evidence suggests that exposure to mercury may also lead to heart disease.

Please sign and share!

sea-shepherd:

January 6, 2014
Sea Shepherd Drives Whaling Fleet Into Disarray  and Out of the Antarctic Treaty Zone

On Monday January 6 at 1650 AEDT, after a 360-mile chase, The Sea Shepherd Fleet drove the Japanese whaling fleet’s factory ship, the Nisshin Maru, out of the Antarctic Treaty Zone.
Sea Shepherd has all ships in the Japanese whaling fleet accounted for, and can confirm that the whale poaching fleet is scattered and currently not hunting whales. The harpoon ships are separated by hundreds of miles. The Nisshin Maru is on the run and unable to stop and whale in its self-designated whale-poaching grounds.
The Japanese whaling fleet was escorted across 60° S and past the northern limit of the Antarctic Treaty Zone by the Sea Shepherd ships The Sam Simon, The Steve Irwin andThe Steve Irwin’s helicopter.
The three Sea Shepherd ships are still in the Southern Ocean and will continue patrols. Should the Nisshin Maru attempt to return to the whaling grounds, Sea Shepherd will be ready to once again intercept and shut down their illegal whaling operations.
Captain of The Steve Irwin, Siddarth Chakravarty said, “This is an optimistic start to Operation Relentless. Within a day-and-a-half we have the entire whaling fleet in disarray.”
Captain of The Sam Simon, Adam Meyersonsaid, “We have won this battle, but the war for the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary will wage on over the coming months.”
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Canon EOS 5D Mark II
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640
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1/100th
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40mm

sea-shepherd:

January 6, 2014

Sea Shepherd Drives Whaling Fleet Into Disarray  and Out of the Antarctic Treaty Zone

On Monday January 6 at 1650 AEDT, after a 360-mile chase, The Sea Shepherd Fleet drove the Japanese whaling fleet’s factory ship, the Nisshin Maru, out of the Antarctic Treaty Zone.

Sea Shepherd has all ships in the Japanese whaling fleet accounted for, and can confirm that the whale poaching fleet is scattered and currently not hunting whales. The harpoon ships are separated by hundreds of miles. The Nisshin Maru is on the run and unable to stop and whale in its self-designated whale-poaching grounds.

The Japanese whaling fleet was escorted across 60° S and past the northern limit of the Antarctic Treaty Zone by the Sea Shepherd ships The Sam SimonThe Steve Irwin andThe Steve Irwin’s helicopter.

The three Sea Shepherd ships are still in the Southern Ocean and will continue patrols. Should the Nisshin Maru attempt to return to the whaling grounds, Sea Shepherd will be ready to once again intercept and shut down their illegal whaling operations.

Captain of The Steve Irwin, Siddarth Chakravarty said, “This is an optimistic start to Operation Relentless. Within a day-and-a-half we have the entire whaling fleet in disarray.”

Captain of The Sam Simon, Adam Meyersonsaid, “We have won this battle, but the war for the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary will wage on over the coming months.”

NOAA Fisheries denies application to import 18 beluga whales for public display

Following a number of public engagement efforts, NOAA Fisheries today announced it is denying the Georgia Aquarium’s request for a permit to import 18 beluga whales from Russia for public display in the United States. NOAA Fisheries based the decision on requirements of the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA).

The MMPA allows marine mammals to be removed from the wild or imported for the purpose of public display, and provides a process for issuing permits. This is the first application for a permit to import recently caught wild marine mammals in more than 20 years.

Common Shark Myths

Myth: Sharks are hungry man eaters looking for any chance to attack.

FactSharks are not hunting humans. Most “attacks” on humans are mistakes due to poor water visibility or are inquisitive bites. This is why there are so many more bites than fatalities.

Myth: Sharks are all the same.

FactShark species are incredibly diverse with very different sizes, shapes, habitats, diets and behaviors. There are approximately 500 shark species, but only three (white, tiger and bull) are responsible for the majority of all bites.

Myth: All sharks are voracious predators.

FactBasking sharks and whale sharks, the two largest species of sharks, are filter feeders that feed on fish eggs and other tiny organisms.

Myth: The only good shark is a dead shark.

Fact: Sharks play a vital role in keeping marine ecosystems balanced and healthy. Additionally, sharks help coastal economies through ecotourism. Many people are willing to pay large sums of money for the opportunity to dive with sharks.

Myth: If a shark attack has not occurred, it means they do not live in that area.

FactSharks inhabit all of the world’s oceans – from inshore, coastal waters to the open, deep-blue sea – and some can even be found in freshwater rivers and lakes.

Myth: Sharks have walnut-sized brains.

Fact: Sharks can exhibit complex social behavior and some species can communicate with body language, live in groups and even hunt in packs. Sharks and rays have some of the largest brains among all fish, with brain-to-body ratios similar to birds and mammals.

Myth: All sharks must swim constantly.

Fact: While most sharks do need to swim continuously in order to pass water over their gills and breathe, some sharks are able to actively pump water over their gills while resting on the sea floor.

Myth: Shark fins grow back if they are cut off.

Fact: A finned shark thrown overboard will drown, bleed to death or be eaten by other sharks.

Myth: Shark fins are flavorsome, nutritious and offer medicinal properties.

Fact: Shark fins offer no flavor or nutritional value. In fact, as top predators, sharks accumulate contaminants from their prey, such as mercury, which has serious health effects even at low doses.

Myth: Sharks have no predators.

Fact: The greatest threat to sharks is HUMANS. Each year, tens of millions of sharks are killed for their fins. We are disrupting the ocean ecosystem by killing too many sharks.

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(Source: the-shark-blog)

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